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​​pinhoti national recreation trail / pinhoti millennium legacy trail

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visit the georgia pinhoti trail association / trail guides and trail info

hmtc tool safety.

(hmtc is no longer active)


personal protective equipment requirements.
One hand or two hand loppers or brush clippers:
Forest Service approved hard hat.
Eye protection.
Appropriate gloves.

most other hand tools including crosscut saws.
All of the above plus:
Heavy Duty, cut-resistant or leather, waterproof or water repellent, 8-inch high laced 
boots with non-skid soles.

chain saws.
All of the above plus:
Hearing protection (85 decibels and higher).
Long sleeved shirt.
Chain Saw chaps with a 2-inch boot overlap.

Note: Chain Saw and Crosscut Saw operators must possess valid
USFS training certification card.

hand tool safety.
(Info taken from the American Hiking Society website)

The following material should be covered with all crew members before the start of any 
trail work.

Proper use begins with a good grip
Wet or muddy gloves may cause a tool to slip from your hands, striking you or someone 
near you.

Watch out for people around you
When chopping or brushing, be aware of any people in the surrounding area. The combined 
length of your arm and tool could reach a person working near you. Also, be aware of trail 
users. Often a user may try to pass right into your backswing. If you see someone coming, 
stop work, notify your co-workers and wait for them to pass.

Make sure you have a clear area in which to swing
Watch out for overhead or side hazards. A hazard is anything that could interfere with 
the complete swing of your tool, and knock it from your hands or down onto any part of 
your body. Keep your tool in front of you at all times. You should never need to swing your 
tool over your head.

Be alert for hazardous footing
Make sure you have a firm, balanced and comfortable stance before starting your work. 
Clear limbs, sticks, loose rocks, or other debris from your footing area.

Choose the right tool for the job
The wrong tool can make you work in an awkward stance, which will wear you out.

Make sure your tool is sharp
A dull tool that bounces off or glances off of what it was attempting to cut can be very 
dangerous. A sharp tool will cut faster and be less tiring.

Carry the tool properly
Always carry tools in your hands and down at your side on the down hill side of the trail. 
Use blade guards whenever possible. Never carry tools over your shoulder.




chain saw safety.
(Info taken from USFS classroom material)

Note: Volunteer use of chainsaws in the National Forest is restricted to those
with USFS Class A, B, or C Sawyers Certification Card.

Felling Procedure (Standing Trees)
1. Observe Top (widow makers, heavy branches, wind)
2. Establish Lay
3. Check For Snags
4. Swamp Out Base
5. Size Up (lean, sounding)
6. Determine And Clear Escape Route
7. Walk Out Lay
8. Re-examine Escape Route
9. Face Tree
10. Oral Warning
11. Backcut
12. Escape From Stump
13. Analyze Operation

Bucking Procedure (Downed Trees)
1. Estimate Reaction
2. Determine Bucking Locations
3. Look For Widow Makers
4. Look For Spring Poles
5. Determine Off-Side
6. Clear Work Area And Escape Path
7. Starting, Stance And Handling
8. Off-Side Cut
9. Watch Kerf !
10. Reduce Remaining Wood

Never do anything that you are uncomfortable with.
Just walk away and live to cut another day!


HMTC

ACTIVITIES

BASE CAMP

TOOL SAFETY

TRAIL CREW

TRAIL MAINT


^ climb up